Iowa Community Empowerment

Annual Report, State Fiscal Year 2007

July 1, 2006 through June 30, 2007

 

INSTRUCTIONS

1.                   Please submit the following information utilizing the format provided.  Additional pages and information may be included.

2.                   The annual report is due September 15, 2007.

3.                   A completed and signed original report should be submitted to the following address electronically to the following email:

Iowa Empowerment Board

Attn:  Shanell Wagler

Office of Empowerment, Department of Management

Room 12, Ground Floor

State Capitol Building

Des Moines, IA  50319

            Shanell.wagler@iowa.gov

 

Date This Report Approved By Local CEA Board: __________________9/4/07______________________________

 

Name of Community Empowerment Area:  Tama County Empowerment

 

Counties/Area Served: Tama

 

Website: http://www.tamacounty.org/Empowerment

 

Current Board Chairperson:             Larry Vest                                         Current Fiscal Agent:  Laura Kopsa

 

Signature:            Signature on File                                                       Signature:            Signature on File                               _____

Address: PO Box 61                                                                         Address: PO Box 61

               104 W. State Street                                                                             104 W. State Street 

               Toledo, IA 52342                                                                             Toledo, IA 52342

Email:            ljvest@iowatelecom.net                                                         Email:            lkopsa@tamacounty.org      

Federal ID Number: 42-6005285

Contact Person for the Community Empowerment Area: Lori Johnson, Empowerment Coordinator

(if different from the Chairperson)

Address: 129 W. High Street, Toledo, IA 52342

Phone:  (641) 484-4788                                 FAX:            641-484-5447                    

E-mail:            ljohnson@tamacounty.org

 

 

SECTION I –

a.            Current Community Empowerment Board Composition on September 15, 2007

A.                 Number of Board Members (Board Size)    11

B.                 Membership Identification. Complete the table below for members on the CEA Board

Column 1            Name of each board member, starting with Chairperson.  Identify any other officers (as determined by your CEA board bylaws.)

Column 2            Identify the member’s representing the required membership. Note the Faith, Business or Consumer representative member may also qualify as citizen/elected.

Column 3 --             Name of employing organization of the member, occupation if self employed

Column 4 --            Name of services/program provided by CE funds

Column 5 --             Place a ‘X” for the board members who qualify as citizen/elected according to the definitions of IAC for Community Empowerment, 349, Chapter I.  (“Citizen” means a resident of the empowerment area, who is not an elected official or a required representative for education, health, and human services, or a paid staff member of an agency whose services fall under the plan or purview of the community board. A citizen representative may also represent faith, consumer or business.)

 

If the board does not meet the membership representation criteria, attach the CEA board’s plan how they will meet requirements. 

 

Column 1

Column 2

Column 3

Column 4

Column 5

Name

Representation

Name of Employing Organization

Provider of CE Services/Program

Citizen/Elected

Chair:   Larry Vest

Board of Supervisors/Citizen

Tama County

No

X

Vice Chair -Joyce Legg

Department of Public Health/Required health

Tama County Public Health & Home Care

yes

Not Applicable

Richard Arp

Education/Citizen

North Tama School District

No

X

Greg Tingley

Business & Industry/Citizen/Required Business

Pioneer

no

X

Jill Herink

Required Education

Meskwaki Settlement School

no

Not Applicable

Angie Knowles

Education

South Tama Elementary School

no

Not Applicable

Earlene Bacon

Citizen

NA

no

X

Mandy Lekin

Required Consumer/Citizen

NA

no

X

Rick Vesely

Required faith/Citizen

United Presbyterian Church

no

X

Michelle Gethmann

Not Applicable

Pied Piper

Yes

Not Applicable

Annette Dunn

Required human services

Department of Human Services

no

Not Applicable

 

 

 

b. Organizational Structure – Please describe:

o        Your organizational structure;

o        How the board functions, communicates, plans and interacts internally; and 

o        How the board functions, communicates, plans within the community.

 

Our Empowerment Board is comprised of 11 voting members.  Members represent the Board of Supervisors, Education, Human Services, Health, Education, Faith, Business, consumer, and local county citizens.  Each person on the Board either lives or works in Tama County and is a representative/advocate of our county.

 

The County strongly supports the Empowerment program by providing the Coordinator through the Public Health Office and the Fiscal Agent is the County Auditor. 

 

We utilize news articles, Preschool Readiness Calendar, and our website to educate our community about our board and it’s activities.

 

See Community Plan.

 

SECTION II – Community Plan

        Provide a brief list or narrative of changes, deletions, or revisions, if any, to the community plan.

(If you are seeking to be redesignated as a Community Empowerment area at this time, please submit a copy of your up to date plan with your annual report.)

 

 

See Community Plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION III.  Indicators and Priorities from Community Plan

 

Identify the indicators as determined by the CEA Board and how the indicators are linked to the State Results.

 

Definition: Indicators are measures that indirectly quantify the achievement of a result.

Definition: Goals are broad measurable statements of intent to set a future direction.

 

Codes for Identifying state results for Indicators:

A.     Healthy Children                      D. Children Ready to Succeed in School

      B.  Secure & Nurturing Families                             E. Safe & Supportive Communities 

     C.  Secure & Nurturing Child Care Environments  

 

If actual data is not available, please insert NA and provide an explanation in the Progress Update column.

 

Community Empowerment Area Indicators

Identify the State Results Linked to the Indicator by A, B, C, D, E

Identify Source of data for each Indicator

Baseline Data

(date & numerical value) *

Sub-Sequent Year’s Data

(Trend Line)*

Identify Year

Goal

(numerical value & projected timeline)

Progress Update (Analysis)

Immunization Compliance

A

Public Health Office-Immunization Compliance with the State

February 2000 immunization compliance rate of  (0 - 24 months) – 71.88%

FY 07

100%

FY 06

93%

FY 05 100%

100% compliance Annually

3 records were analyzed.

# Of children covered by Hawk-I

A

Carla Andorf-MICA

June 2000 -

   23 enrolled

 237 eligible

9.7% of goal

FY 07

267 or 98% of Goal

FY 06

252 or 92% of goal

FY 05 

06 or 75% of goal

 Annually

June 2003 – 201 were enrolled – or 74% of goal

 

The enrollment level for hawk-I has been steadily rising in Tama County.  More and more families are learning about the program and enrolling.  Even though it looks like 98% of families in Tama County who are eligible for hawk-i are enrolled, that isn’t necessarily the case.  The state bases everything on estimates and some counties in Iowa have more than 100% of eligible families enrolled.  That is why outreach must continue.

 

2007 - Hawk-I enrollment con-tinues to rise in Tama which is good.  Indicators have been revised and we will no longer be tracking this indicator.

# Of children born in Tama County.

 

# Children tested for lead

 

# Children with high lead levels

 

A

FACTIS: Iowa Department of Public Health

From 7/94 to 6/99  - 763 children were screened. 174 had a high lead level

 

In 1995, 236 children were born in Tama County.  63.98% of them were tested at least once before the age of 6 years;

18.54% were elevated.  Of the Medicaid-enrolled children, 64.65% were tested; 24% were elevated.

FY 07

Not Available

FY 06

Live Birth Info N/A- July 05-June 06

447 were tested.

23 showed

High lead levels

FY 05

Live Birth Info N/A-

July 04 –June 05 - 442 were tested. 45 showed high lead levels

Annually

# Of children born in Tama County will no longer be tracked as an indicator after FY 06 – 07.

 

FY 04 - From 7/94 to 6/99  - 763 children were screened. 174 had a high lead level

 

In 1995, 236 children were born in Tama County.  63.98% were tested at least once before the age of 6 years;

18.54% were elevated.  Of the Medicaid-enrolled children, 64.65% were tested; 24% were elevated.

 

2004 – 19% of those screened showed high lead levels.

 

Are seeing an increase in the number of children tested and having high lead levels.  Parents are becoming more aware and are having their children tested.

 

2005-10% of those screened showed high lead levels.

 

2006 - We continue to see an increase in the number of children tested.  Parents are still becoming more aware and continue to have their children tested with ongoing education and outreach with physicians, families, and the community at large. 

 

FY 07 – Jackie Pippen notified us that the data is not available, due to computer problems at the State level.

Low Birth Weight Rate

 

 

% Of Obese/Overweight Population

 

A

FACTIS: Iowa Department of Public Health

Baseline to be established:

1)    Tama Co. for 2001=50.8

2)    For 2001, Tama Co. Percent of Obese Population = 23.0%

Percent of Overweight Population = 38.0%

FY 07

N/A

FY 06

N/A

FY 05

N/A

Annually

These two indicators were added for FY 07 – 08 as part of re-designation.  Baselines established.

 

 

 

·    # Enrolled in preschools (utilized immunization card audit statistics)

 

B,E

Public Health Office-Immunization Card Audit

FY 2000 enrollment 273 children

FY 07

414

FY 06

440

FY 05

470

Annually

FY 2000 enrollment 273 children

 

2004 – Preschool enrollment shows an increase as more preschool opportunities become available

 

2005 – Preschool enrollment continues to increase as more opportunities become available.

 

2006 – Kid’s Corner Preschool expanded their facility capacity from 55 to 132, and opened their new building in August of 2006. STC Elementary opened their new building in August 2006 as well. Both facilities have allowed space for increases in enrollment. More preschool scholar-ship funding was utilized this fiscal year.

# With a preschool/Head Start experience

D

Department of Education & local preschools, obtained after school starts in the fall

Baseline to be established in FY 07 - 08

FY 07

N/A

FY 06

N/A

FY 05

N/A

Annually

Indicator was added for FY 07 – 08 as part of re-designation.  Baselines to be established.

Incidence of Founded Child Abuse

 

 

# Of Births to Teens

C

Prevent Child Abuse Iowa

 

FACITS:  Iowa Department of Public Health

Baseline to be established in FY 07 – 08

 

2001 – 11 births to teens

FY 07

N/A

FY 06

N/A

FY 05

N/A

Annually

Indicators were added for FY 07 – 08 as part of re-designation.  Baselines to be established

# Of families completing pre survey on proper nutrition

# Of families completing post survey on proper nutrition

 

A

 

 

ISU Extension Tama County

Year 2001 results will be baseline not developed yet

FY 07

See Family Nutrition Specialist Activities

FY 06

17 families were serviced.

FY 05

14 families were serviced with 12 completing the pre & post survey

Annually

Indicators have been revised and we will no longer be tracking this indicator.

 

FY 04 - Year 2001 results will be baseline not developed yet

 

2004 – Pre & Post Survey statistical data will be available in October 2004.

2005- the Family Nutrition Specialist resigned in December 04, a replacement has not been hired yet.

 

2006-there was no program assistant from June 2005 to September 2005. A new assistant was hired in September 2005 with training being held in September, October, and November. At the end of November 2005 clients were seen through May 17, 2006. Off on medical leave until August 2006

 

Family Nutrition Specialist (FNP) resigned effective February 2, 2007

There was no FNP from 02/03/07-04/30/07.

 

A new FNP was hired with training beginning 05/01/07. She is currently working with clients. Her first 15 clients will graduate July or early August 2007.

·         # Of families participating in parenting programs

 

A, B, C, D

Pat Shank-MICA

Joyce Legg-TCPH&HC

FY 2000

Baseline will be our pre-survey results

 

FY 2002 – Stork’s Nest enrollment – 113 new enrollees

FY 07

5 families attended 4 parenting sessions

 

 

FY 06

54 were added to Stork’s Nest which makes total enrollment in program =265.

Early Head Start- 10 families; 12 children; Tama Health Families- 57 families enrolled; 73 children served; Center Based Head Start 40 children were enrolled.

FY 05

13 families (14 children) were enrolled in MICA's home-based Early Head Start program 47 were enrolled in Tama Healthy Families;

 44 were enrolled in center-based Head Start pre-school. 206 enrolled in Stork’s Nest Program

 

 

Annually

Indicators have been revised and we will no longer be tracking this indicator.

 

1) # Of licensed and/or registered childcare providers

 

 2) # Of providers participating in a Quality Improvement Plan (new FY 07 - 08)

 

3)# of slots available (new FY 07 - 08)

 

4) # Of alternative daycare providers (will not longer track this data after FY 06 - 07)

 

D

Child Care Resource & Referral

1) Baseline is number of licensed, registered daycare providers:

 

·    7 preschools/ day care centers

·    25 registered home care providers

 

2) Baseline to be established - 2007

 

3) Baseline to be established - 2007

 

4) No alternative or special needs providers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FY 07

1) 48 total child care providers (both registered and non-registered) enrolled with CCR&R

 

·   29 Registered Child Develop-

ment Homes

 

·   19 Non-registered providers

 

·         6 preschools/day care centers

 

2) 25 providers participated in a quality improvement plan.

 

3) N/A – to be established in 2007 - 2008

 

4) 9 providers offered 2nd or 3rd shift childcare; 32 providers identified they had experiences in special needs care.

FY 06

1) 70 total child care providers (both registered and non-registered) enrolled with CCR&R

·    33 Registered Child Develop-ment Homes

 

·    7 pre-schools/day care centers

 

2) N/A

 

3) N/A

 

4) 33

Non-registered providers

18 providers willing to 2nd and 3rd shift care.

·         37 providers willing to care for special needs children

 

FY 05

1) 74 total child care providers (both registered and non-registered) enrolled with CCR&R

·   37 Regi-stered Child Development Homes

·   7 Pre-schools/day care centers

2) N/A

 

3) N/A

 

4) 30Non-registered providers

16 providers willing to do 2nd and 3rd shift care

35 providers willing to care for special needs children

 

Annually

The success of this years empowerment programs for early childhood was the number of providers who participation the quality improvement program (54% of the providers on the CCR & R data base) and the percentage of providers who achieved a rating on the state QRS program (50% of the 25 participates or 12 providers.)

 

Based on the adopted indicators, please list the priorities identified in your community plan.

 

Community Empowerment Area Identified Priorities:

Healthy Children; Children Ready to Succeed in School; Safe, Secure, Nurturing Families; Safe, Secure Nurturing Childcare Environments


 

SECTION IV – Collaborative Efforts

Definition adopted by Iowa Empowerment Board: Collaboration involves parties who see different aspects of a problem.  They engage in a process through which they constructively explore their differences and search for (and implement) solutions that go beyond their own limited vision of what is possible. (Gray, 1989).  Relationships evolve toward commitment to the common mission, comprehensive communication and planning, polled resources and shared risks and products.  Authority is vested in the collaborative, rather than in individuals or an individual agency.

 

Describe at least two (2) successful collaborative efforts within the Community Empowerment Area during the last year that promote healthy and successful children 0-5 and their families.   For each collaborative effort describe the results. 

 

Earlier this year a family member called requesting information and assistance for a 3 year old that lived in Tama County.  The 3 year old boy was diagnosed with juvenile diabetes and was requiring blood sugar monitoring and insulin injections 4-5 times every day and a very restrictive diet.   This was complicated by the fact that his mother was also diagnosed with bi-polar disease.  Because of the new diagnosis of the boy, the mother was very protective and never let him stay alone with other relatives or away from her.  On her “good” days things would go OK, but on her “bad” days there was concern for the boy and what he was eating and if she was checking his blood sugars and giving the insulin properly.  Through the collaborative efforts of Tama County Public Health, Tama County Healthy Families and Kids Corner Day Care, we were able to provide home visitation services for this family.  We had an evening training for his grandparents, a friend of the mothers and all the staff at Kids Corner on blood sugar testing, insulin injections and his diet and developed a special plan for this boy so that the mother could feel comfortable and confident that others could take care of him and provided her the respite she needed.  Empowerment scholarship dollars have assisted sending him to Kid’s Corner 3-5 days a week.  This has been a win-win situation for the mother, the boy, the grandparents and Kid’s Corner. 

 

Many agencies in Tama- Toledo are working with a family that I will refer to as FAMILY #1. Family 1 has two children and has been involved with AEA267, Tama Healthy Families, Tama County Public Health, Head Start, and Kids Corner for several years. The parents have many needs, including financial, emotional, and parenting. The children also have developmental needs. The agencies involved with Family 1 continue to communicate to provide the safest and most appropriate services for the children. The oldest child got into Head Start last year, while the youngest received service from Tama Healthy Families and AEA 267. Both children needed respite services through Tama County Empowerment. This has been a much needed service, to help reduce the stress level in the home and to keep the children in a safe environment. The family has been difficult to work with but the agencies have continued to provide quality services for them through continued collaboration and communication.

 

Was showing local Pamida Manager the Empowerment Preschool Readiness calendar (as they collaborated with Tama County Empowerment to make this possible) and his wife, who works at the Iowa Juvenile Home wanted to know if she could have several copies for her classes that she teaches.  She teaches a parenting and career class and she wanted to use it for her students.  One student is working on starting a Day Care.  She said that she teaches approx 20 students per semester.

 

 

 

 

SECTION V & SECTION VI – Performance Measures:  Community Empowerment Early Childhood & School Ready Funds

 

Report program performance measures using the following language:

 

Input - what has been invested in financial and non-financial resources? (dollars invested, number of staff, etc)

•Output - what was produced or changed as an effect of the effort put forth? (number served or trained, number of events, number meeting program outcome, etc)

•Quality - How qualified and efficiently was the activity or service delivered? (percent of qualified staff, percent of customers satisfied, cost or rate per unit, ratio of staff to children, etc)

•Outcome - What was the change in conditions for the people served? (percent meeting the outcome, percent gaining knowledge, percent making change in condition, etc)

 

All columns should have quantitative or numerical data.               

 

Early Childhood Funds

These categories align with the funding parameters identified in Tool G of the Community Empowerment Tool Kit, http://www.empowerment.state.ia.us/common/pdf/kit_tools/toolG.pdf. The categories are as follows:

 

·         Capacity Building/Access to Child Care or Preschools

·         Quality Improvement Support/Incentives

·         Extended hours/2nd or 3rd shift care/infant care/mildly ill care

·         Home or Center Child Care Consultants

·         Child Care Nurse Consultants

·         Provider Training/Professional Development/Materials

·         Other Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early Childhood Services Provided (Coincide w/ Budget Line Items)

How Much Was Invested?

(Input Measures)

How Much Was Done or Produced?

(Output Measures)

How Well Did We Do It?

(Quality/

Efficiency Measures)

What Was the Change In Conditions for Those We Served?

(Outcome Measures)

Child Care Consultant/mat-erials/coordination

 

 

$22,323.79

2662 technical assistance contacts with new providers and current registered providers where conducted by the Child Care Consultant.

 

The childcare consultant made 37 new individual recruitment contacts and visits.

 

1293 direct and in-direct childcare consultant contact hours of services was given during the FY 2007.

34 % of providers visited on the first or second contact visit with the Child Care Consultant registered with DHS as a child care development home

 

90 % of providers visited on the first or second contact visit with the Child Care Consultant in enrolled with CCR&R.

 

39 % of the providers visited on the second contact visit with the Child Care Consultant in identified being on the food program.

 

18 Child Development Home Registration applications where submitted to DHS by the Child Care Consultant

An average score 87 % compliance with DHS registration guidelines was achieved by providers receiving technical assistance from the Child Care Consultant at the first visit.

 

An average score 100 % of compliance with DHS registration guidelines was achieved by providers receiving technical assistance from the Child Care Consultant at the second visit.

 

 

Child Care Provider Training – CCR & R

 

CCR&R will administer training a reimbursement program for childcare providers in the Poweshiek Empowerment Area.   Training grants will be giving to help defray the cost of trainings up to 75%. 

 

CCR&R will provide 12 hours of training in the Poweshiek Empowerment area in the area.

$5,033.96

28 training programs where presented to providers. 

 

4                     4 CCR&R training calendars (once a quarter) where distributed to providers in the empowerment area.

 

 

50 hours of training opportunities for providers where offered to providers in Poweshiek empowerment area.

 

345 providers benefited from attending training session.

 

11 training grant requests where received to date.

 

11 training grants have been paid during the fiscal year 2007.

 

 

100 % of the training grants funded this fiscal year resulted in providers graining knowledge in one or more areas of early care childhood development that will be implemented in their early care and education environment.

 

80% of providers attending training sessions report that quality changes will be made as a result of attending a training session offered through the empowerment training program.

 

 


Provider Support Program – CCR & R

 

Provide Support Program” promotes quality early care and education and is a valuable instrument in encouraging providers to participate in the new Quality Rating System (QRS) developed by the State of Iowa to improve outcomes for all resident children.

$12,887.36

22 Early Care and Education Providers participated in the Provider Support Program and received items that resulted in quality changes in their care and education environments.

100% of the   providers completed the support program in the fiscal year 2007. 

 

100 % of providers participating the Provider Support program submitted an application for an Iowa Quality Rating Systems level during the fiscal year 2007.

 

 

 50 % of providers participating in the Provider Support program achieved a rating of Level 1 or better on the Iowa Quality Rating System at the end of FY 2007.

·         3 Child Development Home at

      Level 1

·         6 Child Care Development Home at Level 2

·         1 Child Care Development Home at Level 3

·         1 Child Care or Preschool at level 2

 

100% of providers that participated in the Provider Support program reported making at less two-quality changes in their early care and educational environments. 

 

Training & Retainment

$4,526.07

The two licensed centers participated in this program. 

 

Pied Piper had 17 employees attending IA PITC Classes last year for a total of 40 hours.

 

Kids Corner had 23 staff that participated in this program.

Pied Piper has a total of 23 employees for the 2006-2007 year with very little turnover.

 

 

 

 

Kids Corner – of the 23 staff, 19 are currently still enrolled in this program.

Pied Piper had a total of 17 employees attending PITC classes. Through empowerment, they were able to provide incentives to their staff to make sure they attended these classes, which were held on Saturdays. These classes helped them in maintaining their Level 2 status and will now continue on for a Level 3, which helps them to obtain a higher quality of care for those that we serve.

 

Kids Corner – all of the 23 staff attended trainings, above the state requirements.  They were able to better serve the children and families because they were able to maintain consistent staff.

A&G

Early Childhood Funds

$3,429.15

113.64 hours were provided

34.4% of ½ of the salary/benefits were funded until 3rd Quarter in the fiscal year.

Efforts were made to incorporate the Empowerment Board under the County’s Liability Insurance.  This funding has been allocated towards the Empowerment Coordinator Position in FY 07. This partially funded the Coordinator position.

 


 

 

 

 

 

Provider Incentives Staff Incentives

$2,127.44

 

 

This was carry over for previous year.  See above information for Training & Retainment.

Classroom Furniture & Equipment

$118.14

 

 

Carry over from previous year. Developmental Equipment reimbursed for a childcare center.  See previous year annual report.

 

School Ready Funds

These categories align with the funding parameters identified in Tool G of the Community Empowerment Tool Kit, http://www.empowerment.state.ia.us/common/pdf/kit_tools/toolG.pdf. The categories are as follows:

 

·         Family Support and Parent Education

The FY 07 School Ready funds to assist low-income families with preschool services must be used for families at or below 200% of the federal poverty level.  However, if sufficient funds are available to meet the needs of families meeting this requirement, the CEA Board may use a sliding scale or other co-payment provision for families above this federal poverty level.

 

·         Preschool Support for Low Incomes Families

The FY 07 School Ready funds that support the Family Support Services and Parent Education Programs for families with children ages prenatal through three must have a home visitation component. After the CEA commits the portion of the SR funds to the other designated purposes stated in legislation, the CE Board shall commit approximately 60% of the remaining funds to support family support services and parent education programs for children ages prenatal through five.

 

 

·         Professional Development Activities w/ AEA, Community Colleges

The SR funds for the purpose of Professional Development that were designated last year (FY 06) will not be a requirement for the use of FY 07 SR funding.  However, any carry forward funds from FY 06 that were designated for this purpose must be expended on Professional Development activities.

 

·         Other Programs/Services

Programs/services that are providing other services.  Examples of other services may include professional development for child care and preschool providers, nutrition, health and dental services, consultation services for early care, health and education providers, and quality improvements for early childhood programs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION VI – Performance Measures: Community Empowerment School Ready Funds

                         All columns should have quantitative or numerical data.              

 

Family Support Performance Measures (use one row for each funded program) – Refer to Tool FF

                                    (Report 60% and prenatal - age 3 funding)

Name of Family Support Program (Coincide w/ Budget Line Items)

How Much Was Invested?

(Input Measures)

How Much Was Done or Produced?

(Output Measures)

How Well Did We Do It?

(Quality/

Efficiency Measures)

What Was the Change In Conditions for Those We Served?

(Outcome Measures)

(Include with the name the model, i.e. HOPES, PAT, etc. if applicable)

 

See below.

Amount expended: 

See below

Number of children participating in the family support program utilizing a home visiting service delivery model (Unduplicated):  637

 

Number of families participating in the family support program utilizing a home visitation service delivery model (Unduplicated):  481

 

Number of face to face visits completed:  701

Percent of children, 0 –3 years old, while enrolled in the program, who are referred for Early ACCESS services:

3%

(Insert any child or family outcome measures reported by the program)

 

Percent of parents with increased parent confidence and competence in their parenting abilities 

100%

Percent of families with an increase of healthy informal support systems

100%

Percent of families able to enhance the health, growth, and development of their children

100%

 

 

 

 

Home Visitation – HOPES like model

$27,660.87

163 Home visits; 134.75 hours

140 unduplicated clients were serviced.

111 unduplicated children participated in home visitation program.

90 families participated.

Through collaborative efforts of the hospital and TCPH& HC all mothers that deliver in surrounding hospitals are offered a post-partum home visit.  During the home visit parents are given education regarding appropriate newborn care and available resources.

Post-Partum Home Visits in Tama County have become a routine expectation after delivery follow-up. Parents have called requesting home visits, if the hospital does not make the referral. 100% of the parents seen have said they appreciated the education, assessments, and referrals they were given.

 

Infant Toddler Specialist

$95,152.55

368 home visits were provided to 54 families with 78 children.  Nine families attended bi-monthly socialization activities.

Staff turnover of one ITDS in September did result in a short time of gap in services.

In February, ITDS’s received training on Maternal Depression and began utilizing a screening tool with mothers.  Nine emotional health screenings were completed; three mothers were identified with possible post-partum depression.  All three were referred to treatment services; two mothers did begin receiving treatment for their depression. 

 

Immunizations of the enrolled children were tracked, and 10 were found to be behind schedule.  Staff provided information and referral, and six of the 10 are now up-to-date on their schedule of immunizations.

Family Nutrition Specialist

$7,260.03

506.24 contact hours provided with 249 teaching hours

2007 – P.A. worked with clients from 8/1/06 through 2/2/07.  Replacement started 5/1/07 and has her first 15 clients well on the way to graduation.

Family Nutrition Specialist was on medical leave from July 1 to July 31, 2006.

 

Family Nutrition Specialist (FNP) resigned effective February 2, 2007

There was no FNP from 02/03/07-04/30/07.

 

A new FNP was hired with training beginning 05/01/07. She is currently working with clients. Her first 15 clients will graduate July or early August 2007.

 

Education conducted at 12 different sites.  Delivered to individuals at 24 sites and to groups at 8 sites.  Targeted audience was pregnant teens and young mothers.  Reached 41 low-income families at exhibits/community events.  Distributed 1025 copies of fact sheets and brochures.  “Partnered” with Tama County Public Health & Home care; MICA; Empowerment: DHS: Iowa Juvenile Home; South Tama Schools; North Tama Schools; Meskwaki Tribal Center; Healthy Start; Partnership Center; Stork’s Nest.  “Marketed” through WIC Clinics; Schools; Libraries; Clothes Closet; Food Pantry; DHS.

 

Stork’s Nest

$14,297.11

134.75 hours

Encourage healthy behaviors during pregnancy, offers pregnancy and new parenting education/support by a rewards system.

Continue to see a dramatic increase in the need and use of the Stork’s Nest Program.  113 new enrollees were added this year.

Parenting Class

$1,937.87

 

Four 2-hour sessions were held.  Five families attended all four sessions

Session topics included:

Making Memories with Children

 

Discipline

 

Playing with Your Children

 

Promoting Language Development

 

One family began using some sign language with her infant son and is pleased with his progress in language development.

 

Parents evaluated their own discipline techniques, with some setting goals to use more positive methods.

 

One family made the decision to reach out to the Department of Human Services for extra support in handling her frustration with her child, recognizing that she didn’t want to “let it go too far”.

Health Care Coordination

$35,795.28

Coordination –

199 hours provided

See QI Funding for Coordinator information.

 

 

Allows for referrals/follow-up referrals, documentation, and necessary meetings to avoid duplication but provide appropriate services.

 

Provides reminders/recall coordination, follow-up for immunizations, lead, and well child screenings.

 

Coordinator attended all required meetings.

See QI

Immunization compliance – 100%

100% of the clients needing follow-up were completed.

High lead level follow-up held to assure homes were remediated and children in need of well child screenings were followed-up.

 

 

 

 

Coordinator – Empowerment Board submitted Annual Report on a timely basis. See QI

                       

 


 

Preschool Programming (Tuition) Support for Low-Income Families - Performance Measures - Refer to Tool CC (B)

Programs Funded

How Much Was Invested?

(Input Measures)

How Much Was Done or Produced?

(Output Measures)

How Well Did We Do It?

(Quality/

Efficiency Measures)

What Was the Change In Conditions for Those We Served?

(Outcome Measures)

 

Number of funded Programs meeting the following standards:

 

NAEYC Accreditation: 1

 

Shared Visions:

 

Head Start: 1

 

ECER average score of 5 (with no subscale score under 2):

 

Completed QPPS process: 2

 

In process for completing any of the above quality standards: 1

 

Meeting comparable standard (also identify standard):

1

 

 

Amount expended:  $88,400.64

 

 

Educational Level of Head Teacher(s) (Total number of each):

 

GED: 0

High School Diploma:  2

Child Development Associate: 0

AA Degree in EC or child development: 2

AA Degree in related field: 0

BA/BS in EC or child development: 3

BA/BS in related field: 0

Post Graduate Degree:  0

 

Number of funded programs utilizing a Child Care Nursing Consultant for technical assistance:  4

 

 

Curriculum(s) used by funded programs: 5

 

Creative Curriculum - 2

Academic Based Curriculum - 1

Early Childhood - 1

Own Curriculum with standards and bench marks – 1

Mailbox, Scholastic, Own - 1

For Children Supported with these funds:

 

Total Number of children  (Unduplicated):  74

 

Number of children by age

(Unduplicated):

3 Year Olds:  13

4 Year Olds:  61

5 Year Olds:  4

 

Number of children by Gender (Unduplicated):

Female:  28

Male:  50

 

Number of children by Race (Unduplicated)

 White:  70

Black/African American:

Asian: 0

American Indian: 3

Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 0

More than one race reported:  3

Other/Unknown:  2

 

Number of children by ethnicity (Unduplicated):

Hispanic/Latino:  6

Not Hispanic/Latino:  69

For Children Supported with these funds:

 

Percent of Children with health insurance: 86%

 

For Children Supported with these funds:

 

Percent of children demonstrating age appropriate skills:  75%

 

(Identify the assessment tool(s) used to determine the children’s development)

 

(Report any other applicable outcomes)

 

1 preschool facility expanded their services and added a 3-year-old program.  52 children were served. 

 

 

 

 

Number of children with health  

insurance:  53

 

Number of children with age appropriate skills:  73

 

 

 

 

Collaborative Professional Development – Performance Measures – Refer to tool DD (B)

(2006 Professional Development Funds that were carried forward into this fiscal year.) 

Note:  Required measures to be reported are in bold.

Collaborators

How Much Was Invested?

(Input Measures)

How Much Was Done or Produced?

(Output Measures)

How Well Did We Do It?

(Quality/

Efficiency Measures)

What Was the Change In Conditions for Those We Served?

(Outcome Measures)

Please list the collaborative partners involved in the professional Development Activities and briefly describe the activities.

 

2 Licensed Centers, Child Care Resource & Referral, ISU Extension.

Amount Expended:

$2,282.90

(Report any other applicable input measures)

 

 

 

Total number of participants by:

 

Number of

Administrators/

Directors:  3

 

Number of

Teachers/Early Childhood

Providers: 6

 

Number of

Assistant

Teachers:  3

 

Report as applicable:

Total number of credits earned:  630

 

Average number of credits earned by participants:  28.6

 

Number of participants working toward CDA: 0

 

Number of participants working toward associate degree: 0

 

Number of participants working toward bachelor degree: 0

 

Total number of participant hours logged:

 

Total number of CEU’s earned:  630

 

Percent of all participants completing coursework by:

 

Percent of

Administrators/

Directors:  100%

 

Percent of

Teachers/Early

Childhood

Providers:  75%

 

Percent of

Assistant

Teachers:  60%

 

Average cost per participant: $96.54

 

Report as applicable:

 

Average cost per credit hour:  $8.32

Percent of participants completing associate degree: 0

Percent of participants completing bachelor degree: 0

 

 

Percent of participants who report incorporating learning into policy or practice:

 

100%

 

 

(Report any other applicable participant outcomes)

 

                        

 

 

 

Quality Improvement Funds – Performance Measures.   Please briefly describe the project or projects used with this funding.  Occasion

Collaborators

How Much Was Invested?

(Input Measures)

How Much Was Done or Produced?

(Output Measures)

How Well Did We Do It?

(Quality/

Efficiency Measures)

What Was the Change In Conditions for Those We Served?

(Outcome Measures)

Please list the collaborative partners involved in the quality early care, health, and education programs

Amount Expended:

See below

(Report any other applicable input measures)

 

 

 

 

 

 

                        

Quality Improvement - Coordinator

$6,934 – was partially funded by Other School Ready Funding.

26.74 hours paid out of this funding

Healthy Families Coordinator

334.25 Hours (total)

·         .34 FTE, average 13.43 hours per week

·         8 Empowerment Board Meetings

·         4 Re-designation Meetings incorporated with regular meetings.

·         1 State Empowerment Meeting

·         1 Association Meeting.

·         1 Day on the Hill.

·         4 Quarterly Empowerment Coordinator meetings were attended.

·         6 Funding Sub-committee Meetings

·         4 Regional Empowerment Coordinator Meeting

·          2 Met with New Board Members

·         2 Board of Supervisors Meetings

Monthly Contact with Representative Horbach and Senator Putney

8% of ½ of the coordinators salary was paid

Calendar developed to promote Empowerment.  Empowerment Board is informed at each meeting which includes:  updates from the state, provider presentations of services provided, updates from the providers receiving funding status of programs, and Board appreciation once a year.

 

Quality Improvement – CCR & R – Child Care Providers & Preschool/Centers

$24,050.02

7 Early Care and Education Providers participated in the Quality Incentive program and received items that resulted in quality changes in their care and education environments.

 

Three of the 6 preschool/centers participated in this program to improve their current quality.

100% of the   providers completed the Quality Incentive program in the fiscal year 2007. 

 

100 % of providers participating the Quality Incentive program submitted an application for an Iowa Quality Rating Systems level during the fiscal year 2007.

 

100 % of providers participating the Quality Incentive program achieved 10 or more quality benchmarks. 

100 % of providers participating in the Quality Incentive program achieved a rating of Level 1 or better on the Iowa Quality Rating System at the end of FY 2007.

·         1 Child Development Home at

·          Level 1

·         3 Child Care Development Home at Level 2

·         1 Child Care Development Home at Level 3

 

76 children will benefit from the quality changes made in the 7 child development homes participating in the Quality Incentive

Dental Hygienist (See under Other School Ready Funding)

$1,695.24

See information under Other Services.  This program was partially funded with School Ready & Quality Improvement Funding

 

 

Infant Toddler Specialist

 

See information under Home Visits.  This program was partially funded with School Ready & Quality Improvement Funding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Services (other than targeted funds) - Performance Measures      Please briefly describe the project or projects used with this funding. 

 

School Ready Services Provided (Coincide w/ Budget Line Items)

How Much Was Invested?

(Input Measures)

How Much Was Done or Produced?

(Output Measures)

How Well Did We Do It?

(Quality/

Efficiency Measures)

What Was the Change In Conditions for Those We Served?

(Outcome Measures)

Safe Kids

$53.42

Helen McKay, BSN, has completed 5 Safe Kids educational sessions in Tama County this past year. 

She completed 2 car seat safety events in Tama County personally helping 12 families with new seats.  A Stork’s Nest presentation was completed on Safe Toys and Poisoning Prevention.  An educational class was also completed at WIC in March on Poisoning Prevention.  A training at Stork’s Nest on Sun Safety in April was postponed but Helen is planning to complete it at a later date.

Trainings were completed at Stork’s Nest, through WIC and out in the community.  Helen provided education on a variety of issues from poisoning to car seat safety to safe toys.  Car seats were provided to families in need and poisoning prevention items like cabinet locks and poison control stickers were provided.  These efforts and supplies directly help the families of Tama County be safer and promote safer communities.

 

Happy Bear

$5,413.13

Information from April 2007 – June 2007 not available

As of March 2007, 16 presentations were given to 292 children and 34 adults.  They had 4 scheduled for the 4th Quarter.

Attendees completed a satisfaction survey.  83% strongly agreed and 17% agreed that the presenter actively engaged the students and the program was developmentally appropriate.  67% strongly agreed and 33% agreed that the program adequately covered information about sexual abuse.  33% strongly agreed and 67% agreed that the students demonstrated an understanding of the sexual abuse information presented.  17% strongly agreed, 67% agreed and 17% disagreed that the program gave an adequate amount of time to practice self-protection skills and that the students were able to demonstrate the ability to apply the self-protection skills taught.  On a scale of 1-5 (5 being the most satisfied) the average for the satisfaction of the presentations was 4.60.

Dental Hygienist  (See Quality Improvement)

$2,553.26

Information from April 2006 to March 2007 (Data for the quarter Apr-Jun 2007 is not yet available.)

Fluoride:  368

Screenings: 461

A hygienist is available to provide screenings, education and fluoride at all WIC clinics in Tama, Traer and starting in September at the Settlement WIC Clinic. 

All children receive a toothbrush and toothpaste after the screening.  Most children receive a fluoride varnish, as well, as it is proven to reduce the rate of cavities.  Children identified with cavities are referred to dental providers and assisted in accessing insurance and setting up an appointment.

Interpreter

$2,450.62

95 ¼ hours

An interpreter was available to provide needed translation to better serve this population.

We doubled the number of hours from the previous year. By doing so we were able to more effectively service a population that was previously underserved with parenting education and healthier families.

 

3 more occasional interpreters were hired and oriented by Tama Co. Public Health & Home Care.

 

Developmental Screening

$4,169.80

Approx 5-10 children have their development screened each month. In Addition 5-10 other family contacts are made to discuss developmental and/or other parenting concerns.

Families are seen on an individual basis at Clinic. An Early Childhood Special Education Teacher does the developmental screening. Parents have the opportunity to talk about any developmental or behavioral concerns that they have about their children. Suggestions, information, and referrals can also be given at this time.

Developmental screenings are available 2 days a month at Clinic.

 

By early screening, children in need of Early Access services can be identified and families can be referred to the appropriate agencies sooner.

Suggestions are made to families to encourage their child’s development. This helps prepare their children for success in preschool.

A & G-School Ready Funds  (See QI Funding)

$8,322.11

193.86 hours

58% of ½ of the Coordinators hours were paid out of this funding.

FY 06 expenses paid ($2,544.86),

and FY 07 expenses.

Preschool and Respite Scholarships (see also Preschool Scholarship Funding)

$3,331.23

Preschool:

The children that attended Kid’s Corner participated in a classroom experience with an appropriate teacher: child ratio for their age group.

This scholarship can also be used for tuition to preschool.

2 children used the Preschool Scholarship for the 2006-07 year.

Respite:

The families that used this program had their children attend Kid’s Corner for Pied Piper for either emergency respite for medical appointments or for general respite services. 7 children used the Respite Scholarships for the 2006-07 year.

Preschool and Respite:

By offering the opportunity for a preschool experience, we are increasing the chances for the children to have greater success in school. The teachers working with the children are available to observe the child’s skills and make appropriate referrals to outside agencies as needed.

Preschool:

The preschool experience increased the children’s preschool/kindergarten readiness skills.

 

Respite:

These children had an opportunity to participate in a safe, nurturing environment while being part of an age appropriate early childhood curriculum.

 

Some of the ways families that receive respite services benefit are:

  1. The families are better able to provide care for their child if they are able to have some needed respite.
  2. The families see the benefit of an early childhood experience.
  3. The families are able to keep emergency appointments.

 

Lead Care Coordination

$3,791.87

95 hours

253 were tested. 8 showed high lead levels.

 Our County still has a high number of older homes with lead based paint. We saw a decrease in lead poisoned children this year and we believe it is because of earlier testing & more parent education on prevention.

Training & Retainment (See previous Training & Retainment under Early Childhood Funding)

$6,312.33

 

 

 

 

SECTION VII –Other Community Investment and Support

 

Identify and briefly describe other funding or support (as appropriate) the community empowerment area has been successful in obtaining and applying toward the community plan.  Identify funds (actual cash amount) that come directly to and flow through the community empowerment area to support the community plan.  Identify value of in-kind as calculated according to usual and customary accounting principles (convert to cash value) that supports the community empowerment area’s community plan. 

Source

Cash Value

Source

In-Kind Cash Value

Pamida – stickers for Calendars

$188.18

 

188.18

AEA 267- Interagency Meetings

 

2 hours a month X $25/hour

600

Ongoing consultation with child care centers and preschools

 

1 hour a month X $25/hour

300

Empowerment Board Meeting Attendance - AEA

 

1 hour/5 times a year X $25/hour

125

Child Care Resource and Referral

$9,660.00

 

 

Sub-committee Meetings

 

6meetings x 2 hours x 8 members x $25/hour

2400

Empowerment Board Meeting Attendance

 

15 x 8 meetings x $25/hour

3000

Pied Piper – Attendance at Empowerment Board Meetings

 

2 meetings and mileage for C-director pd by PP – 1 hr _ mileage if out of town

50

Kids Corner – Attendance at Empowerment Board Meetings

 

Attended local empowerment meetings as a concerned citizen

78

MICA – space – 4 parenting classes

 

 

200

Meeting Space

 

8 meetings x $50

400

Office Space for Empowerment Coordinator

 

$600/month x 12 months

7200

Fiscal Agent & payroll

 

 

7500

Liability Insurance

 

 

3200

ISU Extension of Tama County

 

 

7,897.41

Auditing Services

 

 

1000

Stitch & Go Quilt Group

 

32 quilts quilted x $20/each

43 quilts quilters’ provided the supplies x $42/each

2446

TOTAL

$9,848.18

TOTAL

$36,584.59